Am I a geek or a nerd?


Evaluation Time
June 11, 2010, 8:11 am
Filed under: assessment, Geek | Tags: , ,

My office doesn’t evaluate people. We don’t go into schools and evaluate teachers. It’s a strange position we’re in; schools and teachers require staff development (by law in some cases) and we have the responsibility to provide it, but we do not have the authority to evaluate its impact. That’s not to say we don’t collect numbers, but it’s not specific evaluation of people attending our staff development offerings. We get MEAP numbers, MME numbers, teacher cert numbers, drop out numbers, graduation numbers. One of my plans for next year is to actually try to observe teachers from our networks–not an evaluation, just an observation. 

We also don’t get evaluated ourselves. In some ways this is good. When I left my position as an assistant principal I left behind an a boss who was outstanding at his job, but hard to please as well. His evaluations of me were sometimes confusing, in that he would suggest improvements in things that were simply unmeasurable. One I remember was Visibility. He had trouble articulating what he meant and I’m not sure I ever lived up to what we in his mind, but it was a fuzzy thing to be evaluated on. When I came here, I was accustomed to reporting my work constantly, keeping my boss in the loop so to speak. After about three weeks of my regular emails detailing various projects and proposals, my new boss (also outstanding at her job) replied that I had been hired to do a job and that could just do it, I didn’t need her approval. Wow. So I roll along, creating staff development projects based on district requests and my own anticipation of needs.

Things might be changing. For the first time here, I’ve been asked to evaluate my administrative support. I could write pages on the awesomeness that is Carol–she not only keeps a babillion plates spinning at once, she also cleans up after my figurative messes (like forgetting contracts or mixing up dates or ordering the wrong book).  She tolerates my potty mouth, saves me from sales reps, and lets me borrow her pickup truck.  She came up with the ingenious way to track attendance at our networks. She manages grants in her sleep. And she has excellent penmanship. Okay, great eval on the way. Except when I look at this evaluation document it doesn’t allow me express that we make a great team and she makes up for my shortcomings and I make up for hers. Instead, I have to check boxes ranking her as above average and so on for technical knowledge, accuracy, amount of work, cooperation, flexibility, and punctuality.

Not much of  picture of Carol, is it.

Reminds me of the teacher evaluations. You know, where all teachers are excellent.

Bringing me to my point. I know Carol is awesome, I watch her work everyday. Its only because I’m intimately familiar with her work style and work load that I can say she is great at what she does. I’ve had other secretaries, one was horrible, one was awesome. How do you measure their awesomeness, or lack of? Its so much more than a check list. How do I quantify her creativity (for example, I don’t make my own workshop announcements any more, Carol has a great creative sensibility that allows her to whip these things up and the are always better than what I can do)? The same is true when we look at teachers. Ask any principal who his best teachers are and I’m sure you will get a quick response, but look at the paper trail of observations and you’ll find many more teachers seemingly just as good.  How do these administrators know who is the best and why don’t they record it? They know it because they walk around their buildings all day, hear reports from kids and parents, see who is early to work and late to leave. Principal Walk Throughs were one of my best tools to learn who my go to teachers were–a non-evaluative  and unannounced visit can provide a glimpse of what goes on in our classroom.

Public Impact has created a new website and a report dedicated to the idea that identification and better use of our outstanding teachers can create substantial change for our students. Their assessment of the change possible is inspiring, until you realize that the have jumped right over the GIGANTIC task of IDENTIFYING these amazing people. The report doesn’t clearly state how to determine who the high fliers are, but does give some interesting predictions for what will happen when we use them properly. Okay, so we just ask those principals, right? The ones who are only allowed to use the paper trail of observations as evaluative tools even if they know better. Or maybe test scores? Lets use test scores, cause all kids are exactly the same so it should be a snap to see if the teachers achieved something with their widget children. Oh, I know, lets look at training and credentials. That should tell us. Or not. Seems that credentials aren’t at all a predictor.

The task of evaluating teachers must include bits of all of these things. Just like I with my eval of Carol; its includes my day to day sense, examples of great work, a piece of paper ranking some technical aspects, honesty on my part, openness to being evaluated on hers.  Before we can use our great teachers (or heavens, make staffing and salary decisions) we need to overhaul the current system of check lists for evaluation.

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